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JavaScript (JS) is a dynamic computer programming language.

JavaScript

JavaScript (JS) is a dynamic computer programming language. It is most commonly used as part of web browsers, whose implementations allow client-side scripts to interact with the user, control the browser, communicate asynchronously, and alter the document content that is displayed. It is also being used in server-side network programming (with Node.js), game development and the creation of desktop and mobile applications.1

References

Best Practices

Books

Since 1996, javascript: The Definitive Guide has been the bible for JavaScript programmers—a programmer's guide and comprehensive reference to the core language and to the client-side JavaScript APIs defined by web browsers.
Most programming languages contain good and bad parts, but JavaScript has more than its share of the bad, having been developed and released in a hurry before it could be refined. This authoritative book scrapes away these bad features to reveal a subset of JavaScript that's more reliable, readable, and maintainable than the language as a whole—a subset you can use to create truly extensible and efficient code.

Platforms

Node.js

Node.js is a cross-platform runtime environment for server-side and networking applications. Node.js applications are written in JavaScript, and can be run within the Node.js runtime on OS X, Microsoft Windows and Linux with no changes.2

Frameworks

Vue.js

Vue.js is an open-source progressive JavaScript framework for building user interfaces. Integration into projects that use other JavaScript libraries is made easy with Vue because it is designed to be incrementally adoptable. Vue can also function as a web application framework capable of powering advanced single-page applications.3

React.js

React.js makes it painless to create interactive UIs. Design simple views for each state in your application, and React will efficiently update and render just the right components when your data changes.4

Backbone.js

Backbone.js is a JavaScript framework with a RESTful JSON interface and is based on the model–view–presenter (MVP) application design paradigm. Backbone is known for being lightweight, as its only hard dependency is on one JavaScript library, Underscore.js, plus jQuery for use of the full library. It is designed for developing single-page web applications, and for keeping various parts of web applications (e.g. multiple clients and the server) synchronized. Backbone was created by Jeremy Ashkenas, who is also known for CoffeeScript and Underscore.js.5

AngularJS

AngularJS (commonly referred to as "Angular" or "Angular.js") is an open-source web application framework mainly maintained by Google and by a community of individuals and corporations to address many of the challenges encountered in developing single-page applications. It aims to simplify both the development and the testing of such applications by providing a framework for client-side model–view–controller (MVC) and model–view–viewmodel (MVVM) architectures, along with components commonly used in rich Internet applications.6

Libraries

jQuery

jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML. It is free, open-source software using the permissive MIT License. Web analysis indicates that it is the most widely deployed JavaScript library by a large margin.7

Dojo Toolkit

Dojo Toolkit is an open source modular JavaScript library (or more specifically JavaScript toolkit) designed to ease the rapid development of cross-platform, JavaScript/Ajax-based applications and web sites. It was started by Alex Russell, Dylan Schiemann, David Schontzler, and others in 2004 and is dual-licensed under the modified BSD license or the Academic Free License (≥ 2.1).8

1 JavaScript. (2014, August 28). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:49, August 30, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=JavaScript&oldid=623199819
2 Node.js. (2014, August 27). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:28, August 30, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Node.js&oldid=623095366
3 Vue.js. (2017, November 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15:13, November 18, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vue.js&oldid=810418437
5 Backbone.js. (2017, February 23). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:41, March 5, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Backbone.js&oldid=767018910
6 AngularJS. (2016, February 5). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:56, February 8, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AngularJS&oldid=703464678
7 JQuery. (2017, February 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:28, March 5, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=JQuery&oldid=764980618
8 Dojo Toolkit. (2017, February 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:32, March 5, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dojo_Toolkit&oldid=765081675
Last edited by MichaelAlber .
Page last modified on Sunday December 9, 2018 21:42:28 UTC.