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Information Security means protecting information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction.

Information Security

Information Security means protecting information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction.1

The CIA triad of information security was created to provide a baseline standard for evaluating and implementing information security regardless of the underlying system and/or organization. The three core goals have distinct requirements and processes within each other.2

  • Confidentiality: Ensures that data or an information system is accessed by only an authorized person. User Id’s and passwords, access control lists (ACL) and policy based security are some of the methods through which confidentiality is achieved
  • Integrity: Integrity assures that the data or information system can be trusted. Ensures that it is edited by only authorized persons and remains in its original state when at rest. Data encryption and hashing algorithms are key processes in providing integrity
  • Availability: Data and information systems are available when required. Hardware maintenance, software patching/upgrading and network optimization ensures availability

Resources

  • CIS Controls - Follow our prioritized set of actions to protect your organization and data from known cyber attack vectors.
  • Interact Point Directory: Information Security Links
  • The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) system provides a reference-method for publicly known information-security vulnerabilities and exposures. The National Cybersecurity FFRDC, operated by the Mitre Corporation, maintains the system, with funding from the National Cyber Security Division of the United States Department of Homeland Security.3
  • Internet Protocol Suite is the conceptual model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP because the original protocols in the suite are the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP).4
  • 2600: The Hacker Quarterly

Books

The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage - Cliff Stoll was an astronomer turned systems manager at Lawrence Berkeley Lab when a 75-cent accounting error alerted him to the presence of an unauthorized user on his system. The hacker's code name was "Hunter" — a mysterious invader who managed to break into U.S. computer systems and steal sensitive military and security information. Stoll began a one-man hunt of his own: spying on the spy. It was a dangerous game of deception, broken codes, satellites, and missile bases — a one-man sting operation that finally gained the attention of the CIA...and ultimately trapped an international spy ring fueled by cash, cocaine, and the KGB.

The Cuckoo's Egg - Wikipedia and http://mario.elinos.org.mx/docencia/herseg/cuckoo_egg.pdf
Worm: The First Digital World War Worm: The First Digital World War - From the author of Black Hawk Down comes the story of the battle between those determined to exploit the internet and those committed to protect it--the ongoing war taking place literally beneath our fingertips.

The Conficker worm infected its first computer in November 2008 and within a month had infiltrated 1.5 million computers in 195 countries. Banks, telecommunications companies, and critical government networks (including the British Parliament and the French and German military) were infected. No one had ever seen anything like it. By January 2009 the worm lay hidden in at least eight million computers and the botnet of linked computers that it had created was big enough that an attack might crash the world. This is the gripping tale of the group of hackers, researches, millionaire Internet entrepreneurs, and computer security experts who united to defend the Internet from the Conficker worm: the story of the first digital world war.
Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon - In January 2010, inspectors with the International Atomic Energy Agency noticed that centrifuges at a uranium enrichment plant in Iran were failing and being replaced at an unprecedented rate. The cause of their failure was a complete mystery.

Five months later, a seemingly unrelated event occurred. A computer security firm in Belarus was called in to troubleshoot some computers in Iran that were caught in a reboot loop—crashing and rebooting repeatedly. At first, technicians with the firm believed the malicious code they found on the machines was a simple, routine piece of malware. But as they and other experts around the world investigated, they discovered a virus of unparalleled complexity and mysterious provenance and intent. They had, they soon learned, stumbled upon the world’s first digital weapon.
Secrets and Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World Secrets and Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World - Viruses. Identity Theft. Corporate Espionage. National secrets compromised. Can anyone promise security in our digital world?

The man who introduced cryptography to the boardroom says no. But in this fascinating read, he shows us how to come closer by developing security measures in terms of context, tools, and strategy. Security is a process, not a product – one that system administrators and corporate executives alike must understand to survive.
Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker - Kevin Mitnick was the most elusive computer break-in artist in history. He accessed computers and networks at the world's biggest companies, and however fast the authorities were, Mitnick was faster, sprinting through phone switches, computer systems, and cellular networks. He spent years skipping through cyberspace, always three steps ahead and labeled unstoppable. For Mitnick, hacking wasn't just about technological feats; it was an old-fashioned confidence game that required guile and deception to trick the unwitting out of valuable information.

Driven by a powerful urge to accomplish the impossible, Mitnick bypassed security systems and blazed into major organizations including Motorola, Sun Microsystems, and Pacific Bell. As the FBI's net began to tighten, Mitnick went on the run, engaging in an increasingly sophisticated cat-and-mouse game that led through false identities, a host of cities, plenty of close shaves, and an ultimate showdown with the Feds, who would stop at nothing to bring him down.
The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security The Art of Deception: Controlling the Human Element of Security - The world's most infamous hacker offers an insider's view of the low-tech threats to high-tech security

Kevin Mitnick's exploits as a cyber-desperado and fugitive form one of the most exhaustive FBI manhunts in history and have spawned dozens of articles, books, films, and documentaries. Since his release from federal prison, in 1998, Mitnick has turned his life around and established himself as one of the most sought-after computer security experts worldwide. Now, in The Art of Deception, the world's most notorious hacker gives new meaning to the old adage, "It takes a thief to catch a thief."

Focusing on the human factors involved with information security, Mitnick explains why all the firewalls and encryption protocols in the world will never be enough to stop a savvy grifter intent on rifling a corporate database or an irate employee determined to crash a system. With the help of many fascinating true stories of successful attacks on business and government, he illustrates just how susceptible even the most locked-down information systems are to a slick con artist impersonating an IRS agent. Narrating from the points of view of both the attacker and the victims, he explains why each attack was so successful and how it could have been prevented in an engaging and highly readable style reminiscent of a true-crime novel. And, perhaps most importantly, Mitnick offers advice for preventing these types of social engineering hacks through security protocols, training programs, and manuals that address the human element of security.
The Art of Intrusion: The Real Stories Behind the Exploits of Hackers, Intruders and Deceivers The Art of Intrusion: The Real Stories Behind the Exploits of Hackers, Intruders and Deceivers - Kevin Mitnick, the world's most celebrated hacker, now devotes his life to helping businesses and governments combat data thieves, cybervandals, and other malicious computer intruders. In his bestselling The Art of Deception, Mitnick presented fictionalized case studies that illustrated how savvy computer crackers use "social engineering" to compromise even the most technically secure computer systems. Now, in his new book, Mitnick goes one step further, offering hair-raising stories of real-life computer break-ins-and showing how the victims could have prevented them. Mitnick's reputation within the hacker community gave him unique credibility with the perpetrators of these crimes, who freely shared their stories with him-and whose exploits Mitnick now reveals in detail for the first time, including:

A group of friends who won nearly a million dollars in Las Vegas by reverse-engineering slot machines Two teenagers who were persuaded by terrorists to hack into the Lockheed Martin computer systems Two convicts who joined forces to become hackers inside a Texas prison A "Robin Hood" hacker who penetrated the computer systems of many prominent companies-andthen told them how he gained access With riveting "you are there" descriptions of real computer break-ins, indispensable tips on countermeasures security professionals need to implement now, and Mitnick's own acerbic commentary on the crimes he describes, this book is sure to reach a wide audience-and attract the attention of both law enforcement agencies and the media.

Reading Lists

  • Cybersecurity Canon Archives - Palo Alto Networks Blog - Essential Reading for the Security Professional: We modeled the Cybersecurity Canon after the Baseball or Rock & Roll Hall-of-Fame, except for cybersecurity books. We have more than 25 books on the initial candidate list, but we are soliciting help from the cybersecurity community to increase the number to be much more than that. Please write a review and nominate your favorite.
  • Recommended Reading - This page lists books that I have found to be highly relevant and useful for learning topics within computer security, digital forensics, incident response, malware analysis, and reverse engineering, and other related topics. These books range from introductory texts to advanced research works. While some of these books may seem dated, the information contained is still very useful to people learning today, and much of the information is essential to becoming proficient in the information security realm.5

User Groups / Meetups

Related Topics

1 Information security. (2013, November 2). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:39, November 2, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Information_security&oldid=579903090
3 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. (2017, October 24). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:47, November 23, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Common_Vulnerabilities_and_Exposures&oldid=806836471
4 Internet protocol suite. (2017, September 29). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:21, October 12, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Internet_protocol_suite&oldid=803018685
Last edited by MichaelAlber .
Page last modified on Thursday November 29, 2018 22:24:28 UTC.